Hop Terroir and the Non-Northwestern-United-States

There’s an interesting post over at Beervana.com about the recent rise in hop-growing in states that aren’t Washington or Oregon.

Hop acreage in these states is miniscule by comparison to the Pacific Northwest. (Oregon has 4,600 acres under cultivation and Washington a booming 24,300; Colorado has 75 and Wisconsin and the Northeast similarly measure their acreages in the tens, not thousands.)

Still, these are real numbers. An acre of hop fields produces over 2,000 pounds of hops, so that wee Colorado planting is going to produce around 150,000 pounds of hops. That’s not going to go far at Budweiser, but these growers aren’t working with In-Bev, they’re working with craft brewers.

The article goes on to describe that these small farmers are supporting and being supported by small brewers, but what piqued my interest is that these hops being grown elsewhere in the US will develop their own terroir.  Just as a tomato grown in my back yard in Michigan is going to taste different (not to mention fresher) than a tomato grown in California, boxed and shipped to a local supermarket, hops grown in different areas of the country are going to have different qualities than if they were grown elsewhere.  It’s one of the many beauties of life.  It makes me thankful that our state has great resources like The Michigan Hop Alliance.

Last week, two friends of mine (Mitch and Chris) and I brewed an IPA with hops grown in Australia and New Zealand–Pacific Jade, Rakau, and Galaxy.  It’s currently sitting in secondary with some dry-hops, waiting until next week for us to bottle it.  I am very interested to see how these different hops contribute new flavors, and I’ll be sure to post a review/recipe when it’s done.  If it’s anything interesting like the Nelson Sauvin (another New Zealand hop–very grape-like) and Vienna Malt SMaSH pale ale I did last winter, it’s going to be a hit.

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Filed under Beer, Hops, Terroir

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